340th Engineer Route

  • A Jakes Corner
  • B Johnsons Crossing
  • C Teslin Lake
  • D Teslin
  • E Nisutlin Bay
  • F Morley Bay
  • G Swift River
  • H Little Rancheria River
  • I Watson Lake
  • J Lower Post
  • K Contact Creek
  • L Liard River
A Jakes Corner B Johnsons Crossing C Teslin Lake D Teslin E Nisutiln Bay F Morley Bay G Swift River H Little Rancheria River I Watson Lake J Lower Post K Contact Creek L Liard River

choose a city

Description goes here...

Jakes Corner

Jakes Corner, Yukon

After the bombing of Dutch Harbor, the 340th began their trek to Teslin River marching from Carcross, Yukon through Jakes Corner, 93rd Motor Pool, on the Pioneer Road built for them by the 93rd.

Read More
Road built by the 93rd Regiment

Johnsons Crossing, Yukon

From Jakes Corner, the 340th continued to march to Johnsons Crossing and the Teslin River - a journey of 73 miles. On June 16, they boarded on boats propelled by outboard motors and headed up Teslin Lake to their base camp at Morley Bay.

Read More
Transporting Troops Across the The Teslin Lake

Teslin Lake, Yukon

The regiment traveled this Lake, 78 miles long and 2 miles wide, on barges and sternwheelers and arrived at Morley Bay on June 18, 1942

Read More
Teslin, Yukon

Teslin, Yukon

Both the 93rd and the 340th Engineers invaded this small Tlingit fishing/hunting village. They brought ‘white man’s diseases’ to the unvaccinated Tlingits—with devastating results.

Read More
Transporting Equipment Across Nisutlin Bay

Nisutlin Bay, Yukon

The village of Teslin is located on the shore of Nisutlin Bay. The 340th, short on heavy equipment, began building their section of the highway from Nisutlin Bay and up the Morley River toward Lower Post, British Columbia.

Read More
Morley Bay

Morley Bay, Yukon

About 7 miles south of the Nisutlin Bay, smaller Morley Bay was the base camp of the 340th Engineers in mid-June. Supplies and equipment from Whitehorse on barges pushed by sternwheelers steamed up Teslin Lake to Morley Bay.

Read More
Swift River, Yukon

Swift River, Yukon

Encamped at Morris Lake, 15 miles from base camp, the 340th was behind schedule. Hoge told them to make their road a truck trail and the 93rd would follow bringing the road up to Pioneer standards. The 93rd built a bridge over Swift River and by August encamped at Swan Lake, B.C.

Read More
Little Rancheria River

Little Rancheria River, Yukon

In August the 340th encamped at Upper Rancheria. Their truck trail continued about 130 miles east of Teslin to Little Rancheria where they built a bridge. The 93rd continued their task of upgrading the road.

Read More
Watson Lake Post Signs

Watson Lake, Yukon

The 340th arrived in Watson Lake on 1 September 1942. Their mission was to meet up with the 35th Regiment at Contact Creek. The 93rd continued to upgrade the road and encamped at Pine Lake half way between Watson Lake and Teslin.

Read More
Trading Post in Lower Post, B.C.

Lower Post, British Columbia

The lead bulldozer of the 340th broke their truck trail through to Lower Post by September 5th. The second battalion turned around and began upgrading back to the second Rancheria Crossing.

Read More

Contact Creek, British Columbia

On September 24, 1942, the 340th Regiment and the 35th Regiment met at Contact Creek opening the southern portion of the Alaska Highway

Read More
Pile Bridge at Liard River

Liard River, British Columbia

The 73rd Pontoon Company attached to the 340th established a six-ponton outboard motor ferry across the Liard River. The pile bridge was in its early stage of construction.

Read More

Jake’s Corner?

The 340th second battalion, over 800 men, left Skagway for Carcross and began their march to Teslin River. With limited heavy equipment they were ferried across Tagish River to continue marching past the 93rd Motor Pool at Jakes Corner.

Johnsons Crossing, Yukon

From Jakes Corner, the 340th continued to march on the road built by the 93rd Engineers to Johnsons Crossing and the Teslin River – a journey of 73 miles. On June 16, they boarded boats propelled by outboard motors and headed up Teslin Lake to their base camp at Morley Bay.

Teslin Lake, Yukon

The 340th travelled up on Teslin Lake to Morley Bay – their base camp. They arrived on 18 June joining the 1st battalion from Whitehorse who arrived several weeks earlier.

340th Engineers in Teslin, Yukon

Both the 93rd and the 340th Engineers invaded this small Tlingit fishing/hunting village. They brought ‘white man’s diseases’ to the unvaccinated Tlingits—with devastating results. This small village of Tlingit Indians remained quarantined due to illness. Physicians from the 58th medical battalion arrived to vaccinate those natives who were not ill and care of those you were.

Nisutlin Bay, Yukon

The 340th began building their section of the highway from Nisutlin Bay up the Morley River toward Lower Post, British Columbia. Nisutlin Bay was 7 to 10 miles north of their base camp at Morley Bay. Short of heavy equipment, the regiment made slow progress. They only completed 15 miles before General Hoge changed their mission.

Morley Bay, Yukon

About 7 miles south of the Nisutlin Bay, smaller Morley Bay was the base camp of the 340th Engineers in mid-June. Supplies and equipment from Whitehorse steamed up Teslin Lake to Morley Bay on barges pushed by sternwheelers. The 340th started at Nisutlin Bay, built a bridge over the Morley River and moved on to Morris Lake.

Swift River, Yukon

Fifteen miles from base camp, the 340th was way behind schedule. Hoge told them to forget about pioneer road standards and make their road a single lane ‘truck trail.’ The 93rd would follow, bringing the road up to Pioneer standards.

Little Rancheria River, Yukon

At the end of August the 340th encamped at Upper Rancheria River, 80 miles from Nisutlin Bay. Their truck trail continued another 50 miles to Little Rancheria River where they stopped and built a bridge.

Watson Lake, Yukon

The 340th arrived in Watson Lake on 1 September 1942. The 93rd was 63 miles behind them at Pine Lake. Fourteen year old Frank Watson had come with his father during the gold rush. The two of them wound up on the shores of a lake near the Upper Liard River. When his father returned home, Frank stayed to work their claims. Frank built a cabin, married a local Indian girl and lived a quiet life. In 1941 when an airfield came to the shores of the lake, it became “Watson Lake”.

Upper Liard River, British Columbia

After meeting with the 35th Regiment the 340th moved to Liard River. The 73rd Pontoon Company attached to the 340th established a six-ponton outboard motor ferry across the Upper Liard River at Watson Lake. The pile bridge was in its early stage of construction.

Lower Post, British Columbia

The 340th’s lead bulldozer broke through to the Lower Post Road on September 3rd. Lower Post, just south of Watson Lake, was a small Indian village with log cabins, sod roofs and an old Hudson Bay trading post-still operating. At Lower Post, Hoge modified his plan again. The second battalion turned around and headed back toward the oncoming 93rd, upgrading as they went. The 1st Battalion raced on east toward their historic appointment with the 35th.

Contact Creek, British Columbia

On September 24th at 5 pm, the 35th and the 340th met at Contact Creek. Colonel Lyons and Major McCarty, climbed onto bulldozers to have their picture taken. The Alaska Highway was open from Dawson Creek, B.C. to Whitehorse, YT.

Ordinary Men Build A Legendary Road