93rd Engineer Route

  • A Whitehorse
  • B Skagway
  • C Carcross
  • D WP & YT RR
  • E Tagish
  • F Wagon Road
  • G Tagish Road
  • H M'Clintock River
  • I Jakes Corner
  • J Johnsons Crossing
  • K Teslin Lake
  • L Teslin
  • M Nisutlin Bay
  • N Morley Bay
A Whitehorse B Skagway C Carcross D WD & YU Railroad E Tagish F Wagon Rd G Tagish Rd H M'Clintock River I Jakes Corner J Johnsons Crossing K Teslin Lake L Teslin M Nisutlin Bay N Morley Bay

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whitehorse

Whitehorse, Yukon

A town named after the "white mane" rapids of the Yukon River, grew from 600 to 20,000 in April of 1942. The US Army Northern Headquarters for the Alaska Highway project turned the town, into a small city.

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Skagway, Alaska

A city of 600 souls swelled to 3,600 in April of 1942 when the US Army and the 93rd Engineers occupied their harbor, buildings and airfield for the Alaska Highway Project. The city became a major military troop and supply transport center.

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Carcross

Carcross, Yukon

A "spot in the road", Carcross housed 100 Tlingit Natives, the Watson Trading Post, a railroad depot, Caribou Hotel and Bar and the famous singing, foul mouthed parrot, Polly. In May of 1942, 1200 segegated soldiers of the 93rd arrived. The first white man that ten year old Millie Jones had ever seen was black.

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WD & YT Rail Road

WP & YT Railroad

The 770th Railway Battalion operated the narrow gauge White Pass and Yukon railroad for the Alaska Highway project. The daily train changed to 30 trains per day hauling troops and 280,000 tons of equipment and supplies over the White Pass.

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Lt. Timberlake and Bonaparte catching dinner at Tagish

Tagish, Yukon

The 93rd Engineers arrived June 1942 and crossed the Tagish River, 1275 feet, on a pontoon ferry. Lieutenants Timberlake and Bonaparte caught four trout for dinner. A welcomed change from Spam, Vienna Sausage or Chili.

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Wagon Road

Wagon Road, Yukon

Lt. Walter Dudrow's platoon, improved the wagon road from Carcross to Whitehorse. It was once a section of the Overland Trail to Dawson City.

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Tagish Road

Tagish Road

Today's Tagish Road, called the Supply Road by the 93rd, was improved and widened to the village of Tagish and Jake's Corner.

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Jakes Corner

M'Clintock River

In late July of 1942 the second Battalion of the 93rd pushed the ALCAN Highway from Jakes Corner north to M'Clintock River, 30 of 44 miles toward Whitehorse. The PRA completed the remainder.

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Jakes Corner

Jakes Corner

The 93rd Motor Pool occupied, for a time, this forested area ten miles from Tagish. Jakes Corner was named after Lt. Cleve R. Jacobsen, electrical engineer.

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Johnsons Crossing

Johnsons Crossing, Yukon

This site, named after Colonel Frank M. Johnson, 93rd Commander, is located at the junction of Teslin River and Canol Road. The 93rd encamped , for a time, at Squanga Lake 11 miles from Johnsons Crossing.

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Teslin Lake

Teslin Lake, Yukon

Teslin Lake is 78 miles long and about 3 miles wide. Sternwheelers pushed barges loaded with supplies and equipment up the Lake to Morley Bay.

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Bulldozing the road

Teslin, Yukon

A small Tlingit fishing/hunting village was "invaded" by both the 93rd and 340th Engineers. Many unvaccinated native adults and children died from "white man's diseases".

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Nisutlin Bay Bridge

Nisutlin Bay, Yukon

The village of Teslin is located on the shore of Nisutlin Bay. The Nisutlin River feeds the Bay and Teslin Lake. The Army at first ferried equipment and troops across the 1,917 foot span then built a pontoon bridge.

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Morley Bay

Morley Bay, Yukon

A small bay about 7 miles south of the Nisutlin Bay, was the final location of the 93rd Motor Pool. Equipment and supplies from Whitehorse traveled via stern-wheeler up Teslin Lake to Morley Bay.

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Whitehorse, Yukon

Whitehorse, the legendary town of the Klondike gold rush, boomed again in 1942. During that year twenty thousand military and civilian workers, tasked to build the Alaska Highway, invaded and surrounded the small town. The ‘tote road stampede’ brought more money to Whitehorse than the Gold Rush.

Skagway, Alaska

A city of 600 souls swelled to 3,600 in April of 1942 when the US Army and the 93rd Engineers occupied their harbor, buildings and airfield for the Alaska Highway Project. The origin of the path from the sea to the interior and central portion of the Alaska Highway Project, Skagway became a major military troop and supply transport center.

Carcross, Yukon

A “spot in the road”, Carcross housed 100 Tlingit Natives, the Watson Trading post, a railroad depot, and Caribou Hotel and Bar. Over 10,000 soldiers would pass through their little village on their way to build the highway. In May of 1942, 1200 segegated soldiers of the 93rd arrived. The first white man that ten year old Millie Jones had ever seen was black. By mid-June, most of the 93rd was gone. One hundred and thirty troops remained to guard the bridge and help unload equipment at the depot. The 340th, a white battalion, passed through on their way to Teslin River.

White Pass and Yukon Railroad

The Corps of Engineers appropriated the White Pass and Yukon Railroad as a critical link between the harbor at Skagway and the interior. The 770th Railway Battalion ran it for them. The WP & YT ran a daily train, the 770th ran 30 daily trains.

Wagon Road, Yukon

Lt. Walter Dudrow’s platoon of 42 men made quick improvements to the 50 mile wagon road from Carcross to Whitehorse in early spring. Carcross and Tagish residents had taken as much as three days to travel this rutted road to Whitehorse. In August of 1942 the 93rd sent two companies to bring the road up to Pioneer Standards. General Hoge changed the route to make this part of the Alaska Highway. Now the highway extends from Whitehorse to Carcross and on to Tagish and Teslin River – a V-shaped path with Carcross at the point. As with the rest of the Pioneer Road, the PRA would improve it to the road it is today

Tagish, Yukon

The 93rd Engineers arrived June 1942 and crossed the Tagish River, 1275 feet, on a pontoon ferry. Tagish, a small village, was the traditional home of the Carcross/Tagish Tlingits. It is 23 miles southeast of Carcross. The Tagish river, known to the Tlingits as the Six Mile River, was a popular fishing hole for the soldiers. One soldier attached a hook to a string, tied the string to his rifle barrel and caught a trophy size trout. Lieutenants Timberlake and Bonaparte caught four trout for dinner. According to Lt. Tim, one weighed 19 pounds. It was a welcome change from Spam, Vienna Sausage or Chili.

Tagish Road, Yukon

The 93rd hurriedly carved out the Tagish Road to make a path for the 340th to get to Teslin River. They called it simply ‘the supply road’. With the 340th out of the way, the 93rd continued the road to the village of Teslin and brought its whole length up to Pioneer Road Standards.

McClintock River, Yukon

In the 93rd’s rush to build the road to the Teslin River they arrived at a ‘spot on the ground’ that would be later called Jakes Corner. That was the point at which they had been directed to build road back northwest to Whitehorse. Col. Johnson split two companies off from his main force and sent them in that direction. By late July they were at M’Clintock River, having covered 30 of the 44 projected miles. But the 340th was in serious trouble back to the south and Hoge sent the 93rd to the relief of the 340th. Johnson pulled his companies back from M’Clintock River and the PRA took over. The PRA completed the road from M’Clintock River to Whitehorse and brought it up to standards.

Jakes Corner, Yukon

During its initial foray into the Yukon, the 93rd centered its activities around a forested area ten miles from Tagish. For a short time they located the Motor Pool there and it became what it is today, the spot on the map named Jakes Corner. The name came from Lt. Cleve R. Jacobsen an electrical engineer from Tennessee.

Johnsons Crossing, Yukon

The most important objective for Colonel Johnson of the 93rd on its initial move into the Yukon was a road from Carcross to the Teslin River. The spot where the road crosses the river, appropriately, is named Johnsons Crossing. The headquarters of the 93rd wound up at Squanga Lake. From Johnsons Crossing, the 93rd ferried themselves and their equipment across Teslin River to the other side and began their road to Teslin – 100 miles away.

Teslin Lake, Yukon

Teslin Lake is 78 miles long and about 3 miles wide. While the road that would access Morley Bay was under construction, sternwheelers pushed barges loaded with supplies and equipment for the road builders up the Lake to Morley Bay.

Teslin, Yukon

The 340th encamped at Morley Bay on 18 June and the 93rd crossed Teslin River building a Pioneer Road a hundred miles to Teslin Village. Both the 93rd and the 340th Engineers invaded this small Tlingit fishing and hunting village. They brought ‘white man’s diseases’ to the unvaccinated Tlingits–with devastating results. This small village of Tlingit Indians remained quarantined due to illness. Physicians from the 93rd came to Teslin to care for the sick while others of the 58th medical battalion gathered residents and children to vaccinate them.

Nisutlin Bay, Yukon

Nisutlin Bay which empties into Teslin Lake was squarely in the path of the road builders. The Army at first ferried equipment and troops across the 1917 foot opening then, when the water froze, the 73rd Pontoon built a ice road.

Morley Bay, Yukon

A small bay about seven to ten miles south of the Nisutlin Bay provided a relatively permanent location for the 93rd Engineers Motor Pool, relocated from Jakes Corner to get closer to the action. Equipment and supplies from Whitehorse came by sternwheeler down Teslin Lake to Morley Bay

Ordinary Men Build A Legendary Road